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Why I Support the Reproductive Health Bill

I strongly support the passing of the Reproductive Health Bill.

I believe that there is a need to educate people about sex and their reproductive health. I see nothing wrong in teaching sex education in schools. I would rather my child learn about sex from me and from his teachers rather than from his friends, tv shows, movies and the Internet. Ultimately, I believe that mandatory sex education will benefit the poor; those whose children do not have access to proper sex education since their own parents are misinformed. The anti-RH claim that it is the SOLE responsibility of the parents to educate their children about sex–but what if parents are misinformed? How can the blind lead the blind?

I believe that children are blessings. As blessings, children should be taken cared of properly. They should be given adequate shelter, nourishment, education. Couples who can barely feed themselves should not have 13 kids. My husband and I have stable jobs and I know we won’t be able to raise 13 kids!

There is a need to educate parents about their options for family planning. The “natural” method promoted by the Catholic Church is an option–so are artificial contraceptives. Those who are better off financially have ready access to contraceptives (except maybe in Alabang) but in most cities, health centers are not allowed to provide artificial contraceptives for the poor.

The Catholic Church may still promote the natural method of family planning but let the State give access to alternatives to everyone. A Catholic, even with a bag full of free condoms or birth control pills, can still choose to use the natural method. If a Catholic is strong in faith and believes that using contraceptives is a sin, then he is free to choose not to use them.

I believe that reproductive health should be properly allocated with funds by the government. It is among the many problems that we need to face. I do not see spending money on the improvement of reproductive health as a waste.

I am against abortion. The RH Bill explicitly states that it is against abortion. I feel that it is presumptuous of some to assume that the bill would pave the way for the legalization of abortion.

I am pro-life because I believe that the RH Bill will help improve the quality of life of families.

I am pro-poor because I believe that the Bill will be for the benefit of the poor.

I am pro-RH.

One-liners or Bakit hindi ko sila iboboto

November 2, 2009 3 comments

Let me share brief and shallow reasons why I’m not voting for these people on May 2010:

Loren Legarda – she’s from the media who didn’t do anything for the industry she came from when she was in Senate and she switched from the Admin to the Opposition party when she didn’t get her way.

Manny Villar – because he considered Willie Revillame as a possible VP candidate and is embroiled in the C-5 controversy.

Eddie Villanueva – I don’t want a religious leader to be my president.

Mike Velarde – I don’t want a religious leader to be my president.

Jejomar Binay – nakapalan ako sa mukha nya when he declared himself the “Obama of the Philippines.”

Noli de Castro – He didn’t even prove he was a good VP.

Jamby Madrigal – AYOKO NGA!!!

Richard Gordon – I admire this guy’s work but for some reason, I still won’t vote for him for President.

Nicanor Perlas – sino ka?

Joseph Estrada – he’s had his chance and he blew it big-time. (I don’t want a convicted plunderer as my president.)

Gibo Teodoro – anyone endorsed by Gloria is shit. Sorry.

Mar Roxas – because he’s now Mr. Korina Sanchez

 

 

Caparas is National Artist for Film…GOD Save Us!

August 8, 2009 5 comments

I was listening to the Startalk interview with Carlo J. Caparas and his wife Donna, and I got so angry that I blogged.

For those unaware of what’s been happening, artists are protesting PGMA’s decision to confer the award to an official of the agency that screens the nominees of the said award (Cecille-Guidote-Alvarez), and a movie director (Caparas) whose nomination for the award has been rejected twice. (Read full article here.)

I hate that Caparas is making this into a class fight because it’s not. He is taking this so personally that he feels he has to prove that he deserves the award. What he seems to fail to understand is that people are clamoring against the abuse of power perpetuated yet again by Malacañang.

Caparas says that what’s going on is a “protest syndrome”–that people will protest against anything our president is doing. Mr. Caparas, hindi kami bobo at tanga para tumahimik lang sa isang tabi habang lantaran kaming niloloko at inaabuso ng mga taong nasa kapangyarihan. Ang iyong paghirang bilang isang National Artist ay pinoprotesta namin dahil ito ay isang lantarang pag-abuso ng kapangyarihan ni Gloria bilang presidente. Kahit ano man ang sabihin mo, wala ka sa listahan ng mga nominado ng NCCA na ipinasa nila sa Malacañang. Mismong ang mga miyembro ng panel na nag-deliberate sa listahan na ito ay di malaman kung saan napulot ang pangalan mo.

This really isn’t personal Mr. Caparas but you’re making it as if it was. You may have been an unlucky victim of circumstance but your attempt to prove that you deserve to be a National Artist makes me less empathic. Since you’re standing your ground, no matter how shaky its foundation, I think you deserve the criticisms. The truth is, you don’t deserve to be mentioned in the same breath as Brocka, Bernal, Romero and de Leon.

Caparas referred to his massacre films as justice films–to this I say “bullshit”. His films were poorly executed (yes, I watched some of them on cable) and were obvious acts of exploitation. He says that millions of people watched his movies and that in itself is proof that he deserves the award. If that’s the case then Michael Bay should have already won an Oscar.

Donna says that “award lang naman ito” which obviously showed her ignorance about the kind of undeserved honor her husband has received. Being named as National Artist is way more than that–as a layman, I would like to think that the works of my National Artists represent me as a Filipino to the world. I don’t know about you but I certainly don’t want to be represented by Kris Aquino massacre films.

As a comic novelist, Caparas doesn’t even illustrate his own comics. So technically and unarguably, the honor is undeserved.

He says that he will give part of the monthly stipend he will get as National Artist to streetchildren…he has helped a lot of people in the industry…he has 400 scholars…he sees himself as an inspiration to people since he used to be poor and is now rich because of hard work…

All these prove that Caparas is probably a generous, hard working person but these do not qualify him as a National Artist for Film and Visual Arts.

We are not elitists Mr. Caparas. We say you don’t deserve to be called a National Artist because it’s the truth. No amount of dull, illogical argument can change that.

At this point, I’d like to quote a paragraph from the official statement made by Leo Martinez, Director General of the Film Academy of the Philippines, about the selection of Carlo J. Caparas as National Artist for Visual Arts and Film:

Conferring the highest award on someone who was never in the running makes a travesty of the National Artist Awards, an institution that has been looked up to, venerated even for the recognition it gives to Filipinos whose body of works or whose contribution to the Filipino people is of the highest order. We have as this year’s awardees Manuel Conde for Film and Frederico Alcuaz for Visual Arts. Both are commendable, both beyond question. It has never been done before but had the Organizers wanted to give the same award to more than one person, why not consider the other most deserving nominees. Instead, in our utter disgust, a new category was coined and the two most prestigious awards for Film and Visual Arts were conferred Carlo Caparas.

It is a pity that the National Artist Award has been reduced to a joke.

I don’t feel like laughing.

SHAME! SHAME! SHAME! Shame on you Jamby Madrigal!!!

August 6, 2009 9 comments

A quick post…

I’m tired and haven’t really had the time to blog (blame it on facebook games) but this cannot wait. When Jamby Madrigal announced her intention to run for president, I laughed and treated it as a joke. I’m not laughing now.

Yesterday, I was among the millions of Filipinos who watched as former President Cory Aquino was laid to rest. I noticed that there were politicians who were obviously riding on the event–that was expected. But Jamby’s actions takes the prize–walang kasing kapal ng mukha.

A certain H Appy Feraren posted a note on her facebook page about her experience. While waiting for Cory’s cortege to pass along South Super Highway, she and her mom decided to buy a couple of umbrellas from a vendor. The vendor handed them a yellow bracelet “for free”. This was what the bracelet looked like:

Here’s the original facebook post:

Now that we’ve remembered, relived and recreated the spirit of ’86 let’s make sure this yellow ribbon doesn’t get tangled up in other people’s political campaigns.

Subtle electioneering IN A FUNERAL?!?! SHAME ON YOU. Do not ride on Cory’s wave to pursue your vested interest. The people who waited in the streets weren’t there to see you! The revolution doesn’t belong to you, phony politician, it belongs to the people. And what makes you think you could get away with such a dirty trick? Cory’s lasting impression of sincerity, humility and honesty is now the benchmark of what leaders are supposed to be. You think people don’t see through you? The respect we have for Cory is not something you acquire with falsity (or through endorsement from Judy Ann Santos) it is earned. How dare you pose as someone offering sympathy to the Aquino family while you think about the votes you’re going to get come election time.

As I waited for the cortege (news networks’ new favourite word) along the South Super Highway, my mom and I bought 2 yellow umbrellas from this street vendor who was also selling nuts. And then as we paid, he pulled out something from his pocket – a yellow beaded bracelet nicely packed in a small clear plastic bag. Upon handing it over to us, he said: “Eto o, bonus para sa inyo.”Of course my mom and I were pleased and were all “awww how sweet.”Until I actually looked at the bracelet and saw a little tag with the name and photo of Jamby Madrigal.

I called out to him and asked, “O bakit may Jamby Madrigal itong bracelet na ito” and when I looked at the vendor for an answer he had already walked away.

Maybe an hour before this incident, I saw her car passing by the growing sea of people. Window open, flashing the L sign and strangely enough, a cameraman in front filming the people. My mom started shouting “Transparencyyyy!” and then I looked at her asking if I could put up my middle finger and my mom looked at me and said I should just shout transparency, accountability or good governance. In other words “BOOOOOOOO!!!!” And then the two of us just started shouting BOO JAMBY!!!

I am utterly disgusted by you, Ms.Madrigal. And to you other filthy politicians, behave yourselves because we are all watching you, even if you’re supposedly Cory’s “favorite” mayor. Genuine democracy is People Power and everything Ninoy and Cory stood for. It also means that now, whenever there’s a phony claiming he or she is there to protect Cory’s legacy, we will be able to speak up and act with the same fearless fervour we had before.

You know sometimes I wish I could march in the government offices with a magical broom that can sweep away all the dirty politicians we have in this country. A giant clean up, but this time not just for the environment but for our government. Haha, imagine if we could really do that? I’m already writing down the names of the people I’d attack first with my magic walis!

So, before you file for candidacy (a bit too late though in this case) think again. Actually, good luck! The people have remembered.

To Ms. Feraren, thanks for sharing your experience. Needless to say, a lot of us share your contempt over this.

Why I Will Vote in 2010

May 31, 2009 1 comment

There’s something wrong with the kind of democracy we have in this country. My main gripe has always been this: we put the power of the vote on the people’s hands but we let them remain uneducated. We let them make decisions that will affect the nation for all the wrong reasons. But it’s freedom in its most basic form. I can’t argue with that.

Being part of the middle class, I have a lot of complaints about the government. I realize that being part of the middle class means that the government has received a chunk of my salary before I even get my payslip. It means that everytime I shop or eat at a restaurant, I pay something to the government. Pera ko ang nagpapasuweldo sa mga nakaupo sa gobyerno.

With all the distasteful things that’s been happening in our country, I decided to finally do something. I’ve never voted simply because I don’t believe in the system. But I realized that this is the only system we have and I can’t work against it. If I want change to happen, I have to work with it.

I am finally registered to vote. It took me the entire day (and my ID picture SUCKS!) but I did it.

To those who have been watching in the sidelines, take the plunge. The middle class should go out and vote–we’re practically running the country with all the taxes we’re paying anyway.

Point the gun at the right person: my thoughts on the Hayden Kho scandal

May 28, 2009 3 comments

A lot has been said about the Hayden Kho scandal. This is my point of view on the matter but let me make it short.

So Hayden likes to record himself on video when he has sex. Although it seems perverse to me, I don’t condemn him for that. I don’t understand his reasons but I don’t think he’s evil personified either.

So Katrina had sex with another woman’s boyfriend. It was wrong. We all know that. Both her and Hayden should have known better. You just don’t steal another woman’s man.

Hayden, Katrina and his two other partners are victims because their privacy was violated by the person who posted the sex videos on the internet. I really believe that the senate is after the wrong guy unless the doctor himself uploaded those videos on the net.

This isn’t a women’s rights issue as the senate wants us to believe. This is a privacy issue. I’m thinking that they probably slanted it that way because of how the charges may be filed. Since there’s no existing law on the publication of private videos/photos on the internet, the doctor might be charged with violating provisions of Republic Act 9262 or the Anti-Violence Against Women and Their Children Act of 2004. What’s ironic is that this isn’t the first time something like this has happened. There have been a lot of sex video scandals before but this is the first time that a senator “felt strongly enough” to mention it in the Senate. So how come, until now, there’s still no law to address these kinds of things? Ginagawa ba ng senado ang trabaho nila? I heard that a number of bills have been drawn since 2004(?) but not one has been passed yet.

For someone who has no clear advocacy, the only way Sen. Bong Revilla can run and possibly win in the next elections is to connect his name to a controversy. He picked a good one but I just don’t buy this guy’s crap. At first, I was hoping that this is probably the best way the Senate could be pushed to finally come up with a law for cases like this. But seeing how distorted the whole issue has become, I shudder to think about what kind of bill they’d come up with.

What irritates me more are the people around me who actually download, watch and share the sex videos. The rude and nasty comments made about Katrina’s lust or the women’s “kahayukan” insult me as a woman. Pag narinig mo ang ibang manghusga, akala mo hindi sila nakikipag-sex. Curiosity (and the media) has blown this thing out of proportion.

As for the news media…

There are a lot more important and relevant things to report. Do your job. This isn’t journalism anymore.

Bullies in the Golf Course

January 7, 2009 3 comments

I’ve been trying not to join the blogging bandwagon lately.  I feel that there are some issues that are blogged enough. But this is one particular issue that should and must be blogged about more. Interest should be kept alive. Justice must be served and people should not stop demanding it.

Everyone’s probably aware of what happened last December 26 at the Valley Golf. Politicians and their bodyguards ganged up on a 56-year old man and his 14-year-old son over a minor dispute in the golf course. To read the blog entry of Bambee de la Paz (witness, daughter and sister to the victims), click here.

What happened to the family was both shocking and distasteful. It has proven once again what kind of people we put in power. Politicians who don’t seem to have a decent bone in their bodies–who can drag down and kick a 56-year-old man to the ground without remorse. When I saw how big those  guys were, I almost cried out. It was pathetic really; the thought that such big, powerful men would beat up a pleading 14-year-old and a 56-year-old man over a minor dispute. They’re nothing more than bullies–bullies with bodyguards.

It’s a good thing that the story has been finally publicized by the mainstream media. The family has filed a case against these dastardly politicians and I say good luck to them! The DAR secretary went on TV last night and said that he had no intentions of resigning over the incident. Ang kapal ng mukha! He’s a public servant and common decency dictates that the most acceptable thing for him to do is to resign from his post. His sons should do the same.

I suddenly remembered. Bastos nga pala ang pamilyang ito. They have no idea what the word decency means.

To the de la Paz family, rest assured that a lot of people–people you don’t even know–are backing you up. Keep up the fight. Those big bullies deserve to be put in jail where they belong.